New Buildings In Moscow, Postage Stamps of the Soviet Union, USSR, 1983

These stamps here are perfect examples of Soviet stamps being meant to be sent and seen outside of the Union.  These are architecture projects in Moscow, that to me smack of modernness, and more importantly exhibiting what they had done for the olympics three years prior.  

The entire series was issued on December 15, 1983.  

     This are the first ones I have catalogued and written about that are printed in relief.  The basic idea is that the image is etched out of the plate and when the object is printed, the ink fills in the spaces that were etched out.  It makes for incredibly beautiful and detailed stamps.  They are some of my favorites, and I often have to fight the urge to touch them to feel the printing.

At the end there will be more photos.


This is the Natalya Sats Musical theater, formally known as Moscow State Academic Children’s Music Theater Named After Natalya Sats.  All infomation cited as (Wikipedia) can be found here.  

Details: Issued 12-15-1983, face value 3 Kopeks-it would have sent a postcard.  

    Natalya Sats was the director of this institution in 1921, long before this building was opened in 1979.  Sats and her institution were part of Lenin’s wife wanting children’s art education to resume.  Sats had a break in her directorship due to the purges, but resumed until she died in 1993 at the age of 90.  (Wikipedia). It is very interesting, and if you have time you should read more about this fascinating institution for children.  
The Central House of Tourists

Central House of Tourists

Issued: 12-15-1983

Value: 4 Kopeks, postcard or domestic letter

    The hotel is now called the Astras, and it is still in use today.  Thirty-three floors, 537 rooms, opened 1980.  What I find interesting is the tiny silohouettes of people in the windows, all the way down the hotel.  

Russian Soviet Federation House

Russian Soviet Federation House

Issued: 12/15/1983

Value: 6 Kopeks, post card, domestic letter, small registered item.  I believe registered to cover international as well.  

    As of 1981 this was the seat of Soviet government, and it is still in use for that purpose today.  It is listed as the Russian White House,  it reads to me more similarly to 10 Downing Street in London, home of the government and Prime Minister.  It replaced the Grand Kremlin Palace, which to me is funny.  It would seem that Bolsheviks would have wanted something clean and modern, unassociated with the czars and aristocracy, so this coming so very close to the end of the Soviet Union surprises me.  Of course, they did not know it was going to end in a decade.  

I love this one.  Just look at it.  It makes stamps today look cheap by comparison.  

Izmailovo Hotel

Izmailovo Hotel Complex

Issued: 12/15/1983

Value: 20 Kopeks, Postcard, but in five kopeks it will be more than a post card ever was, domestic letter, registered item.

     Opened in 1979, this is actually a hotel complex consisting of four separate hotels.  It was built, in keeping with the theme, because there were not enough hotel rooms for the coming olympics in 1980, that were to be hosted in 1980.  These are still in operation today, ranging from 3-4 stars.  Interestingly this was the world’s largest hotel until 1993, when another was opened in Moscow.  It was beaten by the expansion of the MGM Grand in Vegas (Wikipedia).
1980 Olympic Press Center

    This one, I admit, gave me some issues.  I had a hard time with the fact that the words in this case are printed in cursive.  I turned to soviet-postcards.com, and it just came back as “News Publishing Agency.”  I looked at buildings added to Moscow in the time frame, and found the part about it being for the olympics.  

1980 Olympic Press Center

Issued: 12/15/1983

Value: 45 Kopeks, this would only have been used to send a registered item, and I speculate internationally.  Stamps were meant to show off to the world, and historaical rates say that no domestic letter needed more than 40 Kopeks.  Registered was between 6 Kopeks and 1 Ruble (100 kopeks to the ruble).  I figure this to be where all the press conferences, maybe the ceremonies and such were held for the olympics in 1980.  Now it is simply noted as being used as office space.  That is a step up from all the abandoned spaces created for the Olympics.  

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The 22nd Olympic Games, Moscow, Stamps of the Soviet Union 1976

Details of the 1980 Summer Olympics taken from here.  Do not forget to cite, like I just did, albeit in a loose format.  

     The Olympic Games of 1980, would be the smallest since 1956, due to a boycott.  The boycott in 1980 was over the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan.  However, these games would still be noteable as the first and only to be held in Eastern Europe to date, and they were the first to be held in a Socialist nation until, remaining the only one until 2008, Beijing China.  The full details can be found above, in the link.  The 1956 games were also boycotted over the Soviet Union.  It is also worth noting that only Moscow, and Los Angeles competed to host in 1980.

    It needs to be understood that the Soviet Union did not produce postage stamps solely for their own citizens usage and collecting.  They intended these stamps to be seen abroad.  They were using their stamps to show off the symbols, ideas, progress, and accomplishments of the Soviet Union, so it should be, I argue, a neccissity to look at Soviet Stamps as best as one can like a Soviet, but also like an outsider viewing a piece of propaganda.  

First in the series, Moscow

   The series consists of four stamps.  The one seen above is the main collectors piece.  It is a miniaturized view of Moscow, or the main center anyhow.  The details:

  • Issued: December 28, 1976 (this was in advance of the games) all stamps
  • Value: 60 Kopeks + 30 Kopeks, this would have almost been registered mail, and I believe, international mail ( just the one pictured.)
  • The bottom reads, ” Moscow- Organizers of the 22nd Olympiad”. (Roughly)

These stamps do have two face values, and that is because they are charity stamps.  The first value, here the 60 kopeks, is postage, and the second, 30 kopeks, goes to charity.  We can’t know what the charity was, but I will check other stamps and if it only occurs with themes, we may make educated guesses.  I would like to thank http://soviet-postcards.com for the information about charity stamps.

    I love this piece.  It is a collector’s plate, with a miniature of Moscow featured.  The stamp itself, if used, features mainly the cathedral ( lower left) and the Kremlin Senate Palace ( upper right.). The actual Kremlin is almost entirely on the collector’s portion, not the postage portion.  I find this piece, especially considering that it would have been a waster of money to mail something domestic with this, to be fascinating.  The stamp was highlighting Moscow, but not the Kremlin, if it was used.  

     The other three are nice, but not nearly as fascinating for me.  They are various Olympic symbols, with banners which read, “Games 22nd Olympiad, Moscow, 80.”  Their values can be seen in photo.  I do like that, as each host city has its own icon for the games, the Moscow Icon was similar to the Soviet Star being placed upon a building. 

Analog Savage

Brandon Bledsoe 

15th Anniversary of the First Human Space Flight, 1976, Stamps of the Soviet Union

On 12 April, 1961, Yuri Gagarin did something that was beyond the scope of words to describe the magnitude properly.  He had become the first human being to fly in space in his Vostok spacecraft.  
    This stamp, which came out after Gagarin had died, was made to commemorate that monumentous occasion.  

Yuri Gagarin

      This is a beautiful piece, in my opinion.  The details:

The top text is the title.  The text under the portrait is his name, Yuri Alekseevich Gagarin.  The text on the medal translates as Pilot Cosmonaut, and I believe the medal to be Hero of the Soviet Union.  Gagarin is seen here wearing the rank of “Polkovnik” or what the United States calls a colonel.  The Piece has a face value of 50 Kopeks.  These are numbered, mine being 110,464 of 450,000.

   Gagarin would die in 1968 piloting as MiG-15.  As I understand it his two daughters are alive and doing very well, both very prominent in Moscow.  With the Cold War over, we can stop and give Gagarin’s contribution to humanity the respect it deserves.  He was the first representative of this species in space.  This year marks the 56th anniversary of Colonel Gagarin’s 1 hour 48 minute trip.  Gagarin also oribited the earth during this trip.  

Close up, Portrait of Polkovnik Yuri Gagarin, 15th Anniversary of the First Human Space Flight, 1976, Stamps of the Soviet Union
Hero of the Soviet Union: Pilot Cosmonaut

Credits: World Book Encyclopedia: 2013, Volumes G and A, G-P.5 A-P.829, entries “Gagarin, Yuri” and “Astronaut”

 1976: Postage Stamps of the Soviet Union

When I started writing this guide to the postage of the Soviet Union, I was still a new collector, but I had a whole year catalogued already.  I had the idea to write a blog/guide later.  Really the two are linked, as there was no such guide when I started.  There still is not now.  There is a rather expensive book, which I should probably get around to buying, which tells the names and some basic collectors information, but still this is the age of the free internet.  This information should be readily available.  So that is what I am trying to do, to share knowledge and information with at least a dozen people.  

    I catalogued 1976 first, I will be going back to write about these while I do 1983.  It will get me all caught up and it will help to keep new content being produced by me.  

    1976 was a big  year, Cold War wise.  You can read the full Wikipedia entry here.  Here is my take on the themes and key events that I see:

    The world was held in a seemingly unending Cold War.  Large events had come and gone and yet not much had changed.  The United States involvement in Vietnam was over and the nation was fully communist at this point.  The world could be described as tired at this point by this unending ideological struggle.  Technology was ramping up more and more, gaining speed as more was developed and advanced, helping to cushion some of the dreariness of the unending Cold War.  There was also hints at what would become the 1980s, as terrorism was picking up, and while terrorism will be later seen as the theme of a post Cold War age, it was also a result of the tensions created during this time, but one persons terrorism is another’s political strife.  You will see punk music taking off as a sign of stagflation gripping the West, stagflation being one more symptom that this was never going to end and was kind of hopeless, as the Sex Pistols say a year later “no future for me.”

  • Gerald Ford was president, but Jimmy Carter was elected same year
  • The Cray 1 super computer was introduced
  • The Philadelphia Flyers defeated the Soviet hockey team
  • The Red Army Faction Trial begins in West Germany
  • The United States Vetoed a U.N. Resolution to form an independent Palestine
  • Cuba’s current constitution enacted
  • Toronto Blue Jays are formed 
  • Videla dictatorship is started in Argentina
  • Argentinian dirt war starts
  • Apple Computer Company is formed
  • The Ramones release their first self titled album
  • The Phillipines open relations with the Soviet Union
  • The Soweto Uprising begins in South Africa 
  • Strikes against communists raising food prices begin in Poland 
  • Socialist Republic of Vietnam formed
  • The United States Bicentennial 
  • The first class of women are inducted at the United States Naval academy, Annapolis 
  • Family Feud debuts
  • The Viking I lands on Mars
  • The United Kingdom breaks ties with Uganda after the hijacking of Air France 139, which also saw Israeli Commandos involved later against the Palestinians 
  • The Seattle Seahawks begin playing 
  • The First (known) Ebola outbreak occurs 
  • Viktor Belenko lands his Mig-25 in Japan and requests asylum from the U.S. (this one is good, we took it apart and examined it, and the Japanese returned it in crates, billing the Soviets $40,000 for crating services)
  • The Muppet Show is first broadcast
  • The “Night of the Pencils” occurs
  • 100 Club Punk Festival goes on
  • U2 is formed
  • The Cultural Revolution in China concludes with 
  • Clarence Norris, last surviving “Scottsboro Boy,” is pardoned
  • Microsoft is registered
  • The Viet Cong is disbanded and folded into the Vietnam People’s army
  • Mao Zedong dies
  • California’s sodomy law is repealed 
  • Richard Dawkins publishes The Selfish Gene
  • IBM introduces the IBM 3800, the first laser printer

All of these can be found on the Wikipedia page for 1976, and more.  This list was cherry picked by me from the larger one.  It is to be your jumping off point or refresher for this year (and decade as I am starting here) so that you can put yourself into this decade and thinks critically about it.  Reading about these events, listening to the music, will begin to give you a grasp of the worlds state, if you want it, so that you will perhaps better understand the stamps the Soviet Union was producing.  

Analog Savage 

Brandon Bledsoe 

Transport and Telecommunications: Stamps of the Soviet Union, 1983

This stamp is most likely titled “Transport and Telecommunication.”  It was issued May 20th 1983.  There is not any text to translate, remembering that почта means is the word for “post” or “mail” and can be found on every stamp.  

    It is a part of the 12th definitive issue, which ran from 1976-1992.  Definitive issues are kind of an odd thing that should be addressed now.  They were supposed to be the pride of the Soviet Post, representing the proud symbols of the Soviet Union.  The part that makes them odd is that the stamps stretch across multiple years.   This stamp certainly fits the theme of globalization with these symbols, the passenger jet liner, the ship, and the bolt for electricity being over the globe.  

    It has a face value of 5 kopeks, and is part of the 1983 series despite the 1982 in the top corner, which I cannot explain.  It may be listed wrong on colnect.com, or it could have been delayed in being issued due to being part of a definitive issue.  

    The other notable feature is that the stamp is tiny.  I put it next to several objects, not having any coins handy, to give a scale.  

12th Definitive issue of The Soviet Union

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